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Sewing

Let’s talk about fabric! You’ve purchased your fabric you’ve bought the pattern and you’re ready to sew! But, suddenly there are all these terms and you have questions. Which way does the fabric go to cut it? What do the lines mean on the pattern? How do you fold your fabric together? Knowing these simple terms will help answer all of those questions.

Fold: Folding the fabric in half makes it easier to cut two of the same piece at once – for example, sleeves or half a bodice when there’s a centre seam. Folding also allows you to cut single symmetrical pieces – notice that some pattern pieces correspond to half of a fabric piece only, and will say “cut on fold” if they’re to be cut like this.  DON’T cut the folded edge when you open up the piece, you will have the full-size piece. Whether you fold your fabric right sides together or wrong sides together is going to depend on your fabric and your markings. If you have a sheer fabric you won’t want to make any visible markings but you will want to mark which side you use as the right side for all your pieces. If you’re using a fabric like the cotton above you will want to fold it right sides together and make your markings on the wrong side.

Selvedge:  is a “self-finished” edge of the fabric, keeping it from unravelling and fraying. The term “self-finished” means that the edge does not require additional finishing work, such as hem or bias tape, to prevent fraying. The edges of a raw fabric that run along the edge with the grain. The fabric has a selvedge edge so that it doesn’t fray before it’s sold. When you fold your fabric to be cut you will fold it selvedge edge to selvedge edge.

Fabric Grain: The orientation of fibres, woven or knit together, to create a fabric. The grain creates lines that run parallel and perpendicular to the selvedge. The basic difference between woven and knit fabrics is in the yarn or thread that composes them. A knit fabric is made up of a single yarn, looped continuously to produce a braided look. Multiple yarns comprise a woven fabric, crossing each other at right angles to form the grain. Stretching is one of the tests to know whether a fabric is knit or woven. A knit fabric will stretch easily along its width, slightly less along its length. A woven fabric will have barely any give along its width, and only slightly more give along its length.

Bias:  is any grain that falls between the straight and cross grains. When the grain is at 45 degrees to its warp and weft threads it is referred to as “true bias. The bias will run diagonally across the grain of the fabric, where the woven fabric has more stretch or give.

Warp: Warp threads are the threads that run along the length of the yardage (up-and-down, vertically) and parallel to the selvage (horizontal axis). The thread that runs the length of woven fabric (“up” and “down”).

Weft: Weft threads are the threads that run from selvage to selvage (side-to-side, horizontally). The threads that run at right angles to the length of a woven fabric, otherwise known as cross-grain. Nonwoven fabrics such as felt, vinyl, suede, and leather do not have warp and weft threads.

DIY Sewing Caddy

Whether you are looking for a mat to avoid your machine slipping or need some accessible storage, this sewing caddy is perfect for any sewing room! It’s easy to make and will leave you feeling organized and ready to sew.

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Make inserting an invisible zipper easier with a Costumakers Zipper Foot! This easy to use zipper foot makes putting a zipper in seamless and fast. Follow these simple guidelines and zippers will no longer be fear when sewing.

  • Choose the correct blue attachment based off of the instructions.
  • Line the needle up with the centre of the foot. When the needle goes down it should be in line with the centre groove.
  • Place one side of your zipper right side down on the right side of the fabric. The edge of the zipper tape should match with the edge of your fabric.
  • Pin or hand baste into place.
  • Roll the zipper teeth back and place in the groove on the foot.
  • Your needle should come down right next to the teeth. Repeat on the other side

Invisble Zippers are so much easier with the Costumakers Zipper foot.For more tips check out or blog post here https://blog.fabriclandwest.com/?p=7812

Posted by Fabricland Midwest/Pacific on Monday, July 29, 2019

This little travel organizer can have so many different uses and it rolls up nicely to be stashed away! You can use this for your toiletries, art supplies, make-up brushes, chef knife set, and just about anything else you can think of! It’s is easy to adjust the size to fit whatever goodies you need. These new prints offer gorgeous colour, prints, and patterns. Use vinyl for toiletries or brushes to make it easy to wipe and clean. Or you could even use terrycloth for a full bathroom feel. With so many options this organizer can meet so many needs!

Travel Organizer DIY
Travel Organizers
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